About Us

Animal Centred Education 

                             
Animal Centred Education (ACE) is an integrated approach to animal wellbeing and education. It incorporates methods that were developed by Sarah Fisher at Tilley Farm, Sarah’s passion for detailed observations and building calm foundations on which further learning can be established, and techniques inspired by animals and other professionals working in the world of animal education and welfare.

How it all began

Ground work on the lead for dogs was a novel concept when TTouch Training for Companion Animals was first developed. It has many benefits and can highlight postural difficulties as well as offering ways to modify a variety of behaviours, and improve gait and balance.

The wide variety of textures/surfaces used today were not originally part of TTouch groundwork. Different surfaces and a range of other sensory items were inspired by the dogs at Battersea almost two decades ago as many did not enjoy body contact. Allowing dogs to engage with a variety of textures has been life enhancing, and life-saving, for dogs that were concerned by contact from the human hand.

We are always looking for ways to simplify every learning opportunity here at Tilley Farm. Thanks to a young, bright Bull Breed blend named Henry who now lives at the farm, Free Work has become a structured method of educating and supporting dogs (and other animals) of all ages providing a safe and rewarding foundation on which further learning can be built.

Although many TTouch Practitioners include the first steps of Free Work within their TTouch sessions, Free Work and detailed observations are not considered to be part of TTouch; hence the creation of Animal Centred Education in October 2018.

Whilst every event is a chance to gain ACE credits, you do not have to work towards certification in order to attend an ACE event. The majority of workshops are open to anyone who would simply like to learn rewarding techniques for the benefit of their canine friends.

  • ACE Certification
  • Many animal educators and care givers are seeing the benefits of integrating ACE methods into their work and many guardians (owners) are enjoying the connections and increased awareness discovered through Free Work.

    You can attend any event to start your ACE training whether you are interested in becoming an ACE Training Club Member, or wanting to gain your ACE Companions certificate with your canine friend.

    There are four tiers in the ACE Training Club.

  • Ace Companions
  • Ace Club Member
  • Ace Associate Tutor
  • Ace Advanced Tutor
  • ACE Credits
  • Every ACE event is an opportunity to gain ACE credits. The number of credits for each event will vary depending on the type of event, the course teacher, and whether you attend the event as a spectator or a handler.

    The aim of the ACE credit system is to enable you to start working towards your ACE certification from the moment you attend any ACE workshop or module, or any event where ACE is a part of that event.

  • Ace Credits
  • ACE Training Club
  • You can join the ACE Training Club for an annual registration fee of £25.00.

    (Renewable January 2021)

    Joining the Club entitles you to 10% discounts on all ACE modules taught by an ACE Instructor at Tilley Farm, giving you a saving of £28 on all three day modules and £47 on all five day courses. It pays to join the ACE Training Club!

    You can register as an ACE Training Club Member at any time but discounts cannot be backdated.

    If you would like to register as a Club Member please complete the registration form and return it to the Tilley Farm office.

  • Ace Courses
  • Meet the Team
  • Registration Form
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Copyright © 2019 Sarah Fisher --- Photographs Courtesy of Bob Atkins